Home > Learning Center > Does Homeowners Insurance Cover an Above Ground Pool?

Does Homeowners Insurance Cover an Above Ground Pool?

Find Your INSURAMATCH

Already have a quote? Retrieve it.

Have you received a replacement quote for your 21st Century Insurance policy? Click to retrieve your existing quote or start a new one.

 | July 19, 2018
Does Homeowners Insurance Cover an Above Ground Pool?

Like many questions about insurance coverage, the answer to the question “Does homeowners insurance cover an above ground pool?” is all about the details. The answer to this question depends upon your personal homeowners insurance policy and what that specific policy includes and excludes. Generally, a homeowners insurance policy should cover most damage to and losses from an above ground pool, however, there are some notable exceptions to be aware of when it comes to above ground pools and insurance cover.

The best resource for questions about your specific insurance coverage is your insurance agent. Since you’ll need to call your agent anyway to notify them and your home insurer about the pool, make sure to ask about the coverage your policy will offer. Some of the information here may not apply to your situation, but as a general guide to help you ask your agent the right questions, here are some points to consider when assessing insurance coverage for your above ground pool.

Is an above ground pool covered by homeowners insurance?

According to homeinsurance.org, most homeowners insurance policies cover structures in your yard. If an above ground pool isn’t listed among your policy’s exclusions, then chances are that your homeowners insurance will offer coverage for it as a structure, IF you specifically add it to your homeowners insurance.

While an above ground pool may not be listed as an exclusion within your policy, it is considered an “attractive nuisance,” which means your insurer sees it as a pretty sizable risk. Getting an above ground pool without disclosing it to your insurer could leave you underinsured or, worse, could void your coverage if your insurer were to find out.

Damage to Your Above Ground Pool

If your above ground pool is covered by your existing insurance, then damage to your pool will likely be covered. Keep in mind that the damage must be caused by a covered peril as outlined in your policy.

Water Damage From Your Above Ground Pool

Coverage for water damage under your homeowners insurance is, shall we say, a bit complicated? This is an area where you’ll want to involve your insurance agent if you have questions. Many types of water damage are generally covered by homeowners insurance with one notable exception: flood. According to Ameriprise, flood damage is caused by:

  • Overflow of inland or tidal waters

  • Unusual and rapid accumulation or runoff of surface waters from any source

  • Mudflow

  • Collapse of land along the shore of a lake or similar body of water as a result of erosion or undermining caused by waves or currents of water exceeding anticipated cyclical levels that result in a flood as defined above

If your above ground pool were to cause water damage on your property, that damage would likely not be considered flood damage, it would be covered. Double check on this with your insurance agent, to confirm that water damage from your pool is covered in your policy language.

Liability

A big concern with pools is liability. Your homeowners insurance includes liability, but your insurer may fear the coverage you have is not enough. Consider adding an umbrella policy for additional liability coverage.

Conclusion

Installing an above ground pool in your yard can make summer even more fun! It does, however, add to your risk as a homeowner. Proper insurance coverage is essential when adding a pool to your home.

Many policies will cover an above ground pool, but you must disclose the pool to your insurer and should consider additional liability protection with an umbrella policy. The best resource for determining if your homeowners insurance covers an above ground pool is to ask your insurance agent or insurer directly or refer to your policy.